People more likely to trust, cooperate if they can tolerate ambiguity, study finds

in epistem •  last month 

Can a new colleague be trusted with confidential information? Will she be a cooperative team player on a critical upcoming project? Assessing someone’s motives or intentions, which are often hidden, is difficult, and gauging how to behave toward others involves weighing possible outcomes and personal consequences.

New research published in Nature Communications indicates that individuals who are tolerant of ambiguity — a kind of uncertainty in which the odds of an outcome are unknown — are more likely to cooperate with and trust other people.

People more likely to trust, cooperate if they can tolerate ambiguity, study finds

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